Break Point: The optimum place to break the target relative to the Center Stake.
Shooting the Stations
Points to remember at every station: 1. Establish correct foot position, with weight shifted to the left leg, right leg for lefties; 2. Mount the gun and establish your Hold Point (usually level with the bottom of the window); 3. Shift your eyes to the Look Point, rather than turning your head; 4. Start moving the gun the instant you see the first flash of the target; 5. Swing with the lower body, not your shoulders; 6. Remind yourself, head on the gun, eyes on the target; 7. Keep your head on the gun before, during, while following through and after the shot -- but your eyes on the target.
Tgts Hold Point Look Point Lead Break Point
H-1 Aligned on the target flight path or slightly below it. Slightly, maybe four or five inches, above the barrel. Common mistakes are holding barrel too high and looking too high or directly down barrel. None. Let the target come to just above the barrel and shoot. Ideally, there should be no vertical movement necessary, but lateral adjustments will be needed if the target flies off-center from the barrel. About 2/3 of the way to the Center Stake.
L-1 About 10 feet out and level with bottom of the window. Just out from Low House window. Bender never gives an actual distance but it looks like about 1-1/2 feet. Shortly past the Center Stake.
Dbls Same as the High House. Same as the High House High House shot's the same, after which drop the gun slightly and pick up the Low House target -- ahead of it. Same as for singles.
H-2 Gun parallel to the house, then moved out three feet. Level with bottom of window. A common mistake here is holding the barrel too high. Slightly off the side of the barrel so your peripheral vision has a good view back to the window and can pick up the first flash of the target. Just get in front of the target and shoot, probably about 1-1/2 to two feet. Before the Center Stake.
L-2 Same as Low 1 -- about 10 feet out and level with the bottom of the window. Just out from Low House window. About 1-1/2 to two feet. Common mistake: Riding the target too far in. Past the Center Stake.
Dbls Same as for High 2. Same as for High 2. Same as for High and Low 2 singles. Same as for High and Low 2. Common mistake: Rushing the target, throwing off your timing for the second shot.
H-3 1/3 distance from the house to the Center Stake, about 20 feet, and level with the bottom of the window. Halfway back from Hold Point to the window. Three to 3-1/2 feet. No later than the Center Stake and preferably 10-15 feet before.
L-3 1/3 distance from the house to the Center Stake, about 20 feet, and level with the bottom of the window. Common mistakes on both: Holding too close to the window, thereby letting the target beat you, and holding the gun too high, blocking the target. Halfway back from Hold Point to the window. Three to 3-1/2 feet. At or maybe 10 feet past the Center Stake.
H-4 1/3 distance from the house to the Center Stake, about 20 feet, and level with the bottom of the window. Halfway back from Hold Point to the window. Three to 3-1/2 feet. Over the Center Stake or 10-15 feet before.
L-4 1/3 distance from the house to the Center Stake, about 20 feet, and level with the bottom of the window. Common mistakes on both: Holding too close to the window, thereby letting the target beat you, and holding the gun too high, blocking the target. Because of the likelihood of background clutter confusing your peripheral vision, look closer to the window, about three or four feet out from it rather than halfway between gun and window. Three to 3-1/2 feet. Over the Center Stake or 10-15 feet before.
H-5 1/3 distance from the house to the Center Stake, about 20 feet, and level with the bottom of the window. Halfway back from Hold Point to the window. Three to 3-1/2 feet. Over the Center Stake, or 10-15 feet past it.
L-5 1/3 distance from the house to the Center Stake, about 20 feet, and level with the top of the window -- but no higher. If targets at a specific range are flying unusually faster or slower, you'll need to move your Hold Point about a foot farther out or in. Common mistakes on both: Holding too close to the window, thereby letting the target beat you, and holding the gun too high, blocking the target. But notice the top of the window hold is an exception to the usually level with the bottom. Because of the likelihood of background clutter confusing your peripheral vision, look closer to the window, about three or four feet out from it rather than halfway between gun and window. Two to 2-1/2 feet. Over the Center Stake, or 10-15 feet before it. Common mistake: Rushing to shoot this fast target too soon.
H-6 About 10 feet out and level with the bottom of the window. Slightly off the side of the barrel so your peripheral vision has a good view back to the window and can pick up the first flash of the target. Bender's not specific on this but it looks to be about 1-1/2 feet. Looks to be about 10-15 feet past the Center Stake.
L-6 Gun parallel to the house, then moved out three feet. Level with the bottom but no higher than the top of the window. A common mistake here is holding the barrel too high and blocking the target. About halfway between gun and window. Numerically, about a foot to 1-1/2 feet, but best to just get ahead of the target and shoot. Looks to be about 10-15 feet before the Center Stake.
Dbls The Low House target is shot first here, so use that Hold Point. The Low House target is shot first here, so use that Look Point. Same as singles. Basically the same as singles, but after the Low House target is taken the eyes shift across the top of the barrel and pick up the High House target with a sustained lead. Pay particular attention, especially right-handed shooters, to a smooth swing both ways using the usual lower body movement.
H-7 About 10 feet out and level with the bottom of the window. All he says about it is, "back toward the house." He mentions no exact amount of lead. Past the Center Stake.
L-7 Aligned with the target flight path right over the Center Stake, but about a foot or foot and a half below it as a hedge against a low-flying target that would be blocked from sight if the gun were higher. Just above the barrel. None. Before or over the Center Stake.
Dbls The Low House target is shot first here, so use that Hold Point. The Low House target is shot first here, so use that Look Point. Basically the same as singles, but after the Low House target is taken the eyes shift to the center of the field and pick up the High House target with a sustained lead. He mentions no exact amount of lead. Same as singles.
H-8 Level with the bottom of the window and about four feet out from the window. Level with the top of the window is acceptable but absolutely no higher than that. Directly at the window. None. Swing quickly and smoothly with the target the moment it's seen, cover it up and shoot. Well before the Center Stake.
L-8 Level with the bottom of the window and about four feet out from the window. Directly at the window. None. Swing quickly and smoothly with the target the moment it's seen, cover it up and shoot. Well before the Center Stake.
Skeet is a regimented, repetitious game and applying the proper techniques consistently while shooting each station, whether in practice or competition, is paramount -- in fact, it's the gold key to success at the game. In Trap, the targets emerge from the house at different angles and at Sporting Clays they're apt to come from anywhere. But with Skeet the targets take the same predictable flight path, at the same height and at the same angle and speed from the High and Low Houses every time. The targets' behavior may differ slightly from range to range but they'll mostly fly the same on any particular field. You'll just have to note any differences from field to field and adjust accordingly. Since the mechanics of Skeet are all consistently repetitious, so should your approach be to dealing with them. And Todd Bender's Skeet videos can definitely teach you the proper approach.
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